Rehab Pilates

Pilates is an effective body condition program that is used as an adjunct to typical physical therapy treatment, and enhances the outcomes of various conditions—low back pain, hip conditions, knee conditions, and chronic pain.

Pilates instruction is also available for self-pay clients. Instruction is available for individuals who wish to enhance their performance and current level of fitness with the STOTT™ Pilates method.

What Is Pilates?

STOTT™ Pilates is a unique approach to the original Pilates method, and is composed of hundreds of therapeutic exercises that restore ideal postural and spinal alignment. It is also effective for rebalancing muscles around the joints.

Programs are modified to consider a client’s specific abilities and to address the goals set forth by their rehabilitation professional.

The Five Basic Principles of Pilates

  1. Pilates includes basic principles that are emphasized throughout every exercise:
  2. Activation of the core muscles—transverse abdominis, pelvic floor, and multifidus—through diaphragmatic breathing to enhance lumbo-pelvic stability.
  3. Pelvic placement to encourage the most shock-absorbing position for the lumbar spine.
  4. Rib cage placement to allow proper activation of the abdominal wall and all spinal motions.
  5. Scalpular movement and stabilization.
  6. Head and cervical placement.

The Rehab Reformer

The Rehab Reformer is a state-of-the-art tool for rehabilitation that offers a method of conditioning with modifications for sports injury.

The reformer allows the therapist to position and condition the patient in an optimal manner. This tool provides the best possible use of body weight and springs as resistance during the routine.

Mat-based exercises that employ smaller equipment may also be advised for clients or home exercise programs.

Pilates in Rehabilitation

If you are recovering from a serious injury or surgical procedure, Pilates is an effective method for working your way back to a high level of function.

Pilates conditioning in the clinical setting follows the principles of rehabilitation and is effective for building strength and stability, while safe to use on sensitive muscles and joints.

After restoring the function of the local stabilizing system, we progress to training the global stabilizers and mobilizers (muscular systems designed to perform movements). The goal of Pilates-based treatment is to restore proper muscle balance and biomechanics for improved postural alignment.